Here is a brief look at some of the recent news stories that featured Neeley students, staff and faculty. For a complete look at Neeley in the News, check out In the News Archives.

 

Businessweek
student teamFebruary 13, 2013
At TCU, Business Majors Must Pass the 'Interview' Test - By Francesca Di Meglio

Sophomores at Texas Christian University are starching their collars and buffing their dress shoes right about now, nervously awaiting job interviews set to take place on the Fort Worth campus on Feb. 16. But these students aren’t looking for employment. Each of the 395 students is looking for a berth in the undergraduate business program at TCU’s Neeley School of Business and the “interviews” are part of the admissions process.

Since 2004, CEOs, local mayors, and executives from companies such as Lockheed Martin (LMT) (LMT), have descended on campus for one day during the spring semester to help usher in a new class of business majors, says Lynn Cole, assistant dean of undergraduate programs at Neeley. Two businesspeople at a time, 120 in all, will interview each student for about 20 minutes this year.

“We want students to take the admissions process seriously and use this interview day as a learning opportunity,” she adds. “It’s never too early to start working with young people and preparing them for what life is going to be like when they get out of here.”

While the interviews rarely hurt an applicant’s chances of being accepted to the school, it’s a required part of the admissions process, one the school says is unique. About a dozen students will get rejected for failing to meet other requirements, including the minimum 3.0 GPA and certification in Microsoft Office, says Cole. “It’s not about the interview,” she adds.

In fact, students say they are given lots of support leading up to the interviews. Each participates in at least one mock interview with other executives and takes a course to help them prepare a résumé and cover letter, which are also part of the Neeley interview.

“Before TCU, my knees would have been shaking,” says Michael Walton, a sophomore hoping to major in accounting and minor in Spanish. “But the school has gone out of its way to prepare us.”

While Walton is going over the notes from his mock interview, his classmate Jordan Gaglione, a sophomore hoping to major in finance, is reviewing the bullet points of his résumé to make sure he can elaborate on them.

“I like to talk to people, so I’m not nervous,” says Gaglione.

The interviewers will be asking applicants about their previous experiences and passion for business, but also about their perception of the global business world and how their studies have prepared them for a career, says Tom Burke, a communications manager at IBM (IBM) in Fort Worth, who has been conducting the interviews since 2005.

“It’s a tremendous benefit for students,” he says. “They begin to realize how they are charting their careers through their studies.”

As for that suit, Walton’s is standing by: “I’ve got the Saturday morning wardrobe set out and ready to go.”



USA Today
greenhouseFebruary 19, 2013
College Courses Enlighten Family Business
 - by Mary Beth Marklein

Unlike many of his classmates, Texas Christian University senior Guillermo Velilla will not be joining the ranks of job-hunters when he finishes school. He has one waiting for him at his family’s business back in his native Paraguay. But that doesn’t mean he has it made.

“It is not as easy as it seems,” says Velilla, 22, whose family owns a meat-processing plant, cattle ranches and related companies. “There is competition out there, and we need to keep the reputation of the family through hard work, honesty and commitment with the community.”

In a stroke of good timing, Velilla this semester is enrolled in a class on managing a family-owned business. The course, which made its debut last spring on the Fort Worth campus, covers topics such as governance and succession planning, and is open to students regardless of whether their families are business owners.

“Many of our business school graduates will also either go to work for a family business or obtain jobs that will deal with family businesses as clients,” says Mark Muller, who teaches the course.

Similar undergraduate courses have been sprouting up on campuses nationwide lately, often riding the coattails of popular new entrepreneurship majors. New York University this spring for the first time is offering an undergrad course on the topic. Savannah State University in Georgia plans to introduce such a class next year. Boston’s Northeastern University launched a course in 2011. A few schools, including The University of St. Thomas in St. Paul and Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, have created family business majors in the last few years.

Demographics and demand may explain some of the recent uptick. Stetson University in DeLand, Fla., which graduated its first class of family-business majors in 2006, says 42% of its business students and 37% of all students come from families involved in family businesses. A number of schools, including Rice University in Houston and the University of Denver, say enrollment in recently launched family business courses is particularly strong among international students such as Velilla.

John Ward, co-director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., also says colleges and universities increasingly recognize that family-owned companies deserve a scholarly spotlight of their own. Recent studies have found that family-controlled businesses, which range from mom-and-pop hardware stores to corporate giants such as Wal-Mart, outperformed other companies on several measures during the recession.

And, according to data from the Family Firm Institute, a non-profit membership association, 77% of U.S. new businesses started as family businesses. They employ 62% of the U.S. workforce. Depending on how you define them, family-owned businesses account for 40% to 90% of the world’s economy.

“You simply can’t ignore that,” says Pramodita Sharma, a professor at the University of Vermont, which offered its first family business course in 2006, and global director of a research initiative focused on family business at Babson College in Babson Park, Mass.

Sharma, who grew up in India, where “everyone I knew was running a (family) business,” suggests that U.S. scholars, who long dismissed the topic as an unimportant area of study, have some catching up to do. In a recent family business competition at the University of Vermont, finalists for the top award came from Spain, Canada and Sweden.

Jeff Vanevenhoven, coordinator of the entrepreneurship major at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, says children of business owners bring to campus the same drive and passion that enabled their parents to succeed — often without benefit of a college education. Since 2010, entrepreneurship majors have been required to take a course in family business. Even so, not all students choose to follow in their parents’ footsteps, and not all parents wish that for their kids.

Frank Salamone, 21, of Rockford, Ill., had planned, after high school, to work for his family’s restaurant and pizzeria, but says his parents urged him to go to college. Now, with a bachelor’s degree in entrepreneurship from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, he is helping out at the family restaurant and plans to pursue a career in green energy.

He also helped his father, Charles, develop a business plan for a product called Forever Lids that is now available internationally through a network of distributors. “My parents told me, ‘Broaden your horizons and see what the world has to offer.’ I’m glad they did,” he says.

Greg Holzbach says he is delighted that son Tony, a senior at Texas Christian University, wants to one day take over The Plant Shed, a wholesale and retail garden center in Fort Worth that he and his wife, Cindy, founded 30 years ago.

“I hope he’ll bring new ideas, allowing us to continually change, to be competitive, in an incredibly challenging market,” says Holzbach, who did not go to college.

Tony Holzbach, 23, who is taking the family business class this semester, says he was initially skeptical that he could learn much from the class.

“My dad is about as knowledgeable in the industry as you can get,” he says. But three weeks into the semester, he says, “I have discovered that there is much more to family businesses than I had realized.”



Supply and Demand
February 13, 2013
TCU’s Neeley School of Business Furthers Supply Chain EducationProgram providing Master of Science in Supply Chain Management Degree to begin fall of 2013

Texas Christian University’s (TCU) Neeley School of Business announced it now offers a Master of Science in Supply Chain Management Degree.

The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to two major transportation hubs—Alliance Texas and DFW International Airport—as well as thousands of corporations producing, shipping and receiving products around the world. That makes the TCU’s Neeley School of Business perfectly situated to provide an advanced academic degree for working professionals in the supply chain field to take their career to the next level.

“Companies have told us that they want advanced education options in supply chain—especially since a degree in supply chain management didn’t exist 10 years ago,” said Dr. Morgan Swink, Professor of Supply Chain and Executive Director, Supply and Value Chain Center, TCU. “Supply chain management evolved out of an affiliation between purchasing, logistics and manufacturing into an integrated, multicultural, cross-functional discipline. The Master of Science in Supply Chain Management gives professionals and their companies a decided advantage in today’s complex, global business environment.”

Neeley’s Master of Science in Supply Chain Management is a 30-hour, evening-only, college-credit program beginning in the fall 2013. Applications are currently being accepted through May 30.

The degree includes a two-week international experience to visit businesses and governments to better understand global opportunities and challenges. A field project (student thesis) teams each student with a faculty member to participate in vital research that immediately impacts the student’s company.

The Neeley School recently announced a non-credit option for supply chain professionals, the Supply Chain Management Certificate, to optimize on-the job experience. “The ability to respond to the complex, worldwide supply and demand of business is vital to give a company a competitive edge,” said Swink. “These two new advanced programs at TCU provide supply chain professionals with the vision and skills to directly impact the company’s bottom line.”

For application, curriculum and tuition information, visit www.neeley.tcu.edu/MSinSCM.

 



Modern materials
February 13, 2013
Neeley School of Business at TCU announces Master of Science in Supply Chain Management degree
Centered in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, TCU is next door to two major transportation hubs, Alliance Texas and DFW International Airport, as well as thousands of corporations producing, shipping and receiving products around the world.

The Neeley School of Business at TCU (Texas Christian University) has announced a new advanced academic degree for working professionals in the supply chain field to take their career to the next level. Neeley’s Master of Science in Supply Chain Management is a 30-hour, evening-only, college-credit program beginning in fall 2013. Applications are currently being accepted through May 30.

The degree includes a two-week international experience to visit businesses and governments to better understand global opportunities and challenges. A field project (student thesis) teams each student with a faculty member to participate in vital research that immediately impacts the student’s company.

“Companies have told us that they want advanced education options in supply chain, especially since a degree in supply chain management didn’t exist 10 years ago,” said Dr. Morgan Swink, executive director of TCU’s Supply and Value Chain Center and professor of supply chain. “Supply chain management has evolved out of an affiliation between purchasing, logistics and manufacturing into an integrated, multicultural, cross-functional discipline. The Master of Science in Supply Chain Management gives professionals and their companies a decided advantage in today’s complex, global business environment.”

The Neeley School recently announced a non-credit option for supply chain professionals, the Supply Chain Management Certificate, to optimize on-the-job experience.

“The ability to respond to the complex, worldwide supply and demand of business is vital to give a company a competitive edge,” Swink said. “These two new advanced programs at TCU provide supply chain professionals with the vision and skills to directly impact the company’s bottom line.”

For application, curriculum and tuition information, visit www.neeley.tcu.edu/MSinSCM

 

Refrigerated Transporter
February 26, 2013
TCU business school offers Supply Chain Management degree

The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to two major transportation hubs, Alliance Texas and DFW International Airport, as well as thousands of corporations producing, shipping, and receiving products from around the world.

That makes the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University (TCU) well-situated to provide an advanced academic degree for working professionals in the supply chain field to take their career to the next level.

Neeley’s Master of Science in Supply Chain Management is a 30-hour, evening-only, college-credit program beginning in autumn 2013. Applications will be accepted through May 30.

The degree includes a two-week international experience to visit businesses and governments to better understand global opportunities and challenges. A field project (student thesis) teams each student with a faculty member to participate in research that immediately impacts the student’s company.

The Neeley School recently announced a non-credit option for supply chain professionals, the Supply Chain Management Certificate, to optimize on-the-job experience.

For application, curriculum, and tuition information, visit www.neeley.tcu.edu/MSinSCM or call TCU’s Supply and Value Chain Center at 817-257-6581

 

Roundtable logo
February 2013
Dr. Nancy Nix: Going Above and Beyond in Supply Chain
- by Nancy Quintana

Nix NancyAt the November Roundtable luncheon, Dr. Nancy Nix, Executive Director, Neeley EMBA Program and Professor of Professional Practice in Supply Chain Management, was recognized for her work with CSCMP and for the SCProTM Certification launched by CSCMP during her tenure on the Board of Directors. As the Immediate Past Chair and a long time board member for CSCMP, she helped set the direction for this certification which she speaks very highly about. SCProTM is focused on an individual’s knowledge from an integrated supply chain perspective (from sourcing through delivery), and includes three levels of capabilities. Level 1, rolled out in Fall 2011, covers operational elements. Level 2 will be rolled out next year and will focus on collaboration, analysis, and problem solving in the supply chain. Level 3 will focus on the ability to drive change, and will incorporate a real-world project with demonstrated results. Dr. Nix observes that over the last 10-15 years, there is much more focus on the development of supply chain talent and a need for more educational opportunities. She has seen our profession grow to be viewed as more strategic by companies. These companies realize the great benefit a successful supply chain can attribute to their bottom line and success in the market.

CSCMP has played an important role in Dr. Nix’s career. She first became a member of CSCMP more than 20 years ago, served as a volunteer with the Research Strategies Committee from 2002 to 2008, and as a Board member since 2005. She currently serves as Immediate Past Chair of the Board of Directors. In her volunteer roles, she has learned a great deal, made great connections, built lasting friendships, and has had an opportunity to help move CSCMP forward. She believes local Roundtables play a critical role in the vibrancy and health of the organization. “DFW has consistently been one of the stronger Roundtables over a number of years” Dr. Nix explains. “The DFW team engages members to understand what is happening in our industry and what we can do to move it forward.” From her observation, the benefits of being a part of CSCMP go far beyond the education a member can acquire, and many long-time volunteers have great pride in the organization they have helped progress. She especially encourages young people to get involved, explaining that it provides great leadership development opportunities no matter what role an individual plays managing the supply chain.

Dr. Nix is an extremely accomplished woman with a very impressive resume. In addition to her involvement with CSCMP, she also is on DSC Logistics Advisory Board of Directors, the Bio Supply Management Alliance Advisory Board of Directors, and is a member of the Institute for Supply Management. She has presented to numerous industry and academic organizations, has been recognized for her work by the Neeley School of Business, CSCMP DFW Roundtable, and DSC Logistics, and has published in several academic journals, including her most recent publications on supply chain collaboration in the Journal of Operations Management and Journal of Business Logistics.

Dr. Nix brings multiple perspectives to her role as a supply chain educator and CSCMP Board member, with both industry experience and academic credentials. She started her career with the DuPont Company. In her 14 years with DuPont, she acquired extensive management experience. She later moved to Reliance Industries, Ltd., serving as the Joint VP, Logistics in Mumbai, India. After earning her Doctorate degree from the University of Tennessee in 2001, she was recruited by TCU to build the Supply Chain program. Recognized among the leading programs in the US today, Dr. Nix is very proud of the program and is quick to recognize her colleagues Zach Zacharia, Ph.D., Laura Meade, Ph.D., and Morgan Swink, Ph.D. as part of the team responsible for the success. All three have been active volunteers with CSCMP over recent years.

Today, Dr. Nix is responsible for Neeley’s Executive MBA program, teaches executive and graduate level courses in Global Supply Chain Management and Supply Chain Strategy, and leads study abroad programs in locations such as China, India, and South America. In fact, her most recent travels were to India with MBA students during the first couple weeks of 2013.

When she finds time in her busy schedule, she can be found at the DFW Roundtable events. She is more than happy to discuss opportunities for supply chain education and career development through CSCMP, or TCU’s Supply Chain and EMBA programs.