News & Events | Neeley in the News 

Here is a brief look at some of the recent news stories that featured Neeley students, staff and faculty. For a complete look at Neeley in the News, check out In the News Archives

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April 7, 2017
The Best and Brightest Business Majors Class of 2017 – by Jeff Schmitt

In January, Poets&Quants reached out to 55 top undergraduate business programs, asking them to each choose two representatives based on their “academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, personal character, innate potential, striking personal narrative, and overall impact on the program.”

In other words, these are the crème-de-la-crème of each school based on the opinion of faculty and administration. Overall, 49 schools participated in our 2nd annual “Best & Brightest,” with Wharton being the lone member of Poets&Quants’ Top 25 Undergraduate Business Programs to decline participation.

Indeed, the class is a potent mix of dreamers and doers, who alternated between leading and serving as well as creating and sustaining. This year’s Best & Brightest come from all walks of life. You’ll find class presidents and homecoming kings alongside all conference athletes, budding entrepreneurs, and scholars with unblemished GPAs. They honed their business acumen from growing up in the family business, watching Shark Tank re-runs, and competing in Model UN. Determined, brimming with optimism, and always on the go, these students were known to all, often reminding professors why they entered teaching in the first place. Some even helped teach classes! During summers, you would have found them interning at Goldman Sachs and Google…not to mention the FBI and DreamWorks. Come graduation, they’ll represent the next great crop of young talent at landmark firms like McKinsey, Bain, JP Morgan, and IBM.

Why major in business? Ask 100 business majors and you’re bound to get 100 different answers. Lehigh’s Kelly Mayid, for one, appreciates the discipline’s versatility. “I was able to take such a wide variety of core business courses,” she notes. “Everything you learn—ranging from accounting to marketing—is applicable to multiple fields.”

Over their four years, the Class of 2017 has absorbed bruising lessons that still confound many of their more seasoned counterparts. For many, the biggest takeaway has been the value of peers.

The importance of self-awareness is another theme connecting this year’s best and brightest business majors. “People hire people, not skills,” exhorts Texas Christian University’s Adam Beasley. “Understand yourself and others and you will go far.”

Next month, the Best & Brightest business majors will be donning their caps and gowns to walk the aisle with “Pomp & Circumstance” at their backs. As they reflect on their four years, many have high hopes on how they will ultimately be remembered. Many wish to be known for their impact, altruism, or passion. However, Guo would like her classmates to remember her for carrying herself according to the values she espouses. “And I hope that doesn’t start only after graduation,” she adds, “but rather that this is what my peers would say of me now.”

 

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April 7, 2017

2017 Best and Brightest: Adam Beasley, Texas Christian University – by Jeff Schmitt

Beasley AdamAdam Beasley
Texas Christian University, Neeley School of Business

“Adventurer who is passionate about Jesus, Cristopher Nolan, photography, marshmallow guns, and knowing people.”

Fun fact about yourself: I once crashed a wedding in Pune, India.

Hometown: Huntsville, Alabama

High School: Huntsville High School

Major: Entrepreneurial Management

Minor: Finance and Communication Studies

Favorite Business Courses: Business Law, corporate entrepreneurship, the nature of giving, and values entrepreneurship

Extracurricular Activities, Community Work and Leadership Roles During College:

  • Neeley Fellows honors business organization
  • Chancellor’s Scholar
  • Beta Theta Pi, VP of Risk Management and Recruitment Chair
  • KinderFrogs volunteer
  • Neeley Ambassadors
  • Entrepreneurship Club of TCU, VP of Marketing
  • Paradox Church City group leader
  • Cultural Routes honors abroad participant
  • Frog Camp facilitator for incoming TCU freshmen
  • Leaders for Life mentor
  • Global Scholars
  • Entrepreneurship Pitch competition runner-up

Where have you interned during your college career?

  1. DaVita Inc. – Redwoods Analyst Intern – Denver, CO.
  2. Latitude Imports – International business development intern – Pune, India
  3. Cedar Hills Farm – Farm Hand – Fayetteville, TN

I recently accepted a full- time offer from Bain Consulting when I graduate.

Describe your dream job: I would be the entrepreneur-in-residence at TCU, while also being responsible for planning a study abroad trip each year. I would have enough free time to volunteer as a mentor at an angel investing organization and coach my kids’ sports teams.

Which executive or entrepreneur do you most admire? Jeff Bezos has created an unstoppable monster. The dominance that Amazon has achieved is completely contributable to the efforts and tactics of Bezos.

What did you enjoy most about majoring in a business-related field? Entrepreneurial management contributed to my desire to see opportunity in every situation and form a productive team to capitalize on that opportunity.  

Where would you like to work after graduation?  Bain & Company – Associate Consultant. Already offered and accepted this job before I event graduate!

What are your long-term professional goals? Attend business school. Start a business with co-founders I met at school. Operate this business until it gains enough success to sell off. Retire as an adjunct professor who runs a study abroad program.

What advice would you give to a student looking to major in a business-related field? Try to get a degree that fills both sides of your brain, i.e. business and communication studies or computer science and graphic design. Well-rounded individuals are much more fun and productive to work with

“I knew I wanted to major in business when…I first opened up a marshmallow gun business and made $60. Designing my products and solving a creative problem with a friend fueled me.”

“If I didn’t major in business, I would be…a traveling photo-blogger.

“Before I entered business school, I wish I had known…how critical computer programming is to every business in today’s world.”

What was the happiest moment of your life? Every moment I get off a plane at home and see my mom and dad jumping up and down in excitement for my return home is the happiest moment of my life.

Which academic, extracurricular or personal achievement are you most proud of? Designing, coordinating, and operating a chapter retreat for my fraternity.

What animal would you choose to represent your professional brand? A golden retriever. I’m a loyal friend, great listener, excellent “fetcher,” and adventurous learner.

Who would you most want to thank for your success? My dad. As I left for college he told me that college is more about the relationships you build than the grades you get. This advice, along with a plethora of other nuggets of wisdom, has shaped me into the man I am today.

What would you like your business school peers to say about you after you graduate from this program? He was always willing to put the books down when anyone needed him. He valued me more than he valued success

Favorite book: Love Does by Bob Goff

Favorite movie: The Prestige by Christopher Nolan

Favorite musical performer: NeedtoBreathe

Favorite vacation spot: Florence, Italy

What are your hobbies? Photography, blogging, hunting, running, traveling, sand volleyball, reading

What made Adam such an invaluable addition to the Class of 2017?

“Adam is one of the most well-rounded students that I’ve come across in a long while. He is an excellent student with the ability to work in a group or produce excellence on his own. He is involved on campus in different leadership roles, and he has great work experience. Adam is a high-quality individual who will always represent his organization in the best light possible. I have enjoyed getting to know Adam and look forward to seeing what he accomplishes.”

Dr. Bill Moncrief
Professor of Marketing
Academic Director for Neeley Fellows
Neeley School of Business
Texas Christian University

“Adam combines the best qualities a student can possibly possess. First, he has a razor-sharp mind, an amazing intellect. Second, he took his responsibilities for my class very, very seriously. Finally, he’s just a really good guy – friendly, upbeat, the kind of person you want to hang out with.”

Dr. Rob Rhodes
Professor of Management
Neeley School of Business
Texas Christian University

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April 7, 2017
2017 Best and Brightest: Zach Miller, Texas Christian University – by Jeff Schmitt

Miller Zach newsZach Miller
Texas Christian University, Neeley School of Business
I am a fun and easy-going…finance major.” 

Fun fact about yourself: I am a Texan who learned to two-step from a Michigan-born girl at a London pub.

Hometown: Mansfield, TX

High School: Mansfield High School

Major: Finance

Favorite Business Courses: Financial Management, Personal Finance, Investments 1 & 2, Foundations in Leadership, Team Leadership Skills

Extracurricular Activities, Community Work and Leadership Roles During College:

  • BNSF Neeley Leadership Program
  • Resident Assistant
  • TCU Women’s Basketball practice player
  • CFA Scholarship
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • TCU Intramural Champion (Basketball)

Where have you interned during your college career?

  • Goldman Sachs, Dallas, Private Wealth Management
  • Luther King Capital Management, Fort Worth, Equity Research

Describe your dream Job…I want to be a wealth manager and help professional athletes after they retire.

Who is your favorite professor? Dr. Mo Rodriguez – I took Financial Management as a May-mester with Dr. Rodriguez. The class went by so quickly. Dr. Rodriguez simplified the material and made the class enjoyable.

Which executive or entrepreneur do you most admire? J. Luther King. He is my boss (internship) and is the CEO of Luther King Capital Management. He has encouraged and propelled me and hundreds of other past TCU students toward success through the LKCM internship. He is one of the most thoughtful and hard-working men I know. I owe a great amount of my success to him.

What did you enjoy most about majoring in a business-related field? I had the opportunity to learn with extremely smart individuals at a great facility at TCU. My field is filled with an abundant amount of opportunities and I was able to interview with over 25 Fortune 500 companies because of my degree.

Where would you like to work after graduation? I will be working at IBM as a Sales Representative after I graduate.

What are your long-term professional goals? I want to go into wealth management and help professional athletes maintain their wealth after their retirement.

What advice would you give to a student looking to major in a business-related field? Business is a fantastic field to major in. Every student should look for 2-3 internships to get a better understanding of their major and what they want to do after college. The internship is to see if you like the job position or not. If you do not like the position try something new!

“I knew I wanted to major in business when…TCU invited me to the TCU High School Investors Challenge when I was in high school. It’s a week in the summer on campus, for juniors about to be seniors in high school, to learn about the stock market. Then, we each manage a virtual $1 million dollar portfolio throughout the year and report back to TCU. I fell in love with the stock market through that unique experience.”

“If I didn’t major in business, I would be…a computer scientist.”  

“Before I entered business school, I wish I had known…how fast college would fly by so that I could enjoy every moment with my friends.”

What was the happiest moment of your life? I went to Europe with my TCU Neeley peers and traveled to London, Isle of Skye, Dublin, and Barcelona with my BNSF Neeley Leadership cohort.

Which academic, extracurricular or personal achievement are you most proud of? I created a personal finance course at TCU with fellow students Bre Cooper and Andrew Rheil so graduate students will be able to have a better understanding of how to create a budget, do their taxes, and pay for their next home or car.

What animal would you choose to represent your professional brand? I would choose a lion because every animal respects the lion. They are confident and are fearless. In this world the only one who can hold you back from success is the person in the mirror.

Who would you most want to thank for your success? My mother and father because they gave me the opportunity to go to TCU. It ultimately set me up to have to amazing internships and a great full-time offer at graduation. I am extremely lucky to have great parents.

What would you like your business school peers to say about you after you graduate from this program? Zach was kind-hearted, worked hard, and was reliable.

Favorite book: I enjoy reading the Alex Cross series.

Favorite movie: Good Will Hunting

Favorite musical performer: Usher

Favorite vacation spot: Barcelona, Spain

What are your hobbies? I love to play basketball. I also love looking over my personal budget…yes, I know, but I’m a finance major.

What made Zach such an invaluable addition to the Class of 2017?

“Zach Miller is a tireless investor in his own personal growth and the development of others. His consistency to be full present, organized and prepared allows him to excel in a formal presentation to an impromptu challenge that needs to be solved.”

Brett Phillips
Program Manager, BNSF Neeley Leadership Program
Neeley School of Business
Texas Christian University

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April 18, 2017
Streets Ahead Awards: Revive Eco sees busy year following prestigious prize boost – by Ann Fotheringham

reviveWinning a Streets Ahead award kick-started a busy year for Glasgow’s best ‘eco-prise’. Fergus Moore, one of the founders of coffee recycling company Revive Eco, says the prestigious prize was a fantastic boost.

“Getting the support of your local city is amazing,” he explains. “We were very fortunate in our first year to get some recognition around the world but to be recognized in the community we started in meant a great deal. The prestige associated with an award supported by the Evening Times and Glasgow City Council and partners really helped to boost our credibility.”

He adds: “It was also fantastic to be part of the event itself – it was a great night and we were proud to be there.”

Revive Eco won the Green Glasgow Business Award, after impressing judges with their commitment to recycling and reducing waste. The company started up in May 2015 as a business project at Strathclyde University for students Fergus Moore, Scott Kennedy and Rebecca Richardson.

While working part-time in local coffee shops, they were appalled by the amount of food waste produced on a daily basis and so decided to work together to do something about it. The trio set up a ‘waste rejuvenation eco-prise’ specializing in recycling used coffee grounds and transforming them into bio-fertiliser and biomass pellets.

Within a few months, they had won prestigious awards at the Values and Ventures Competition in Texas and the Young Innovators Challenge closer to home, and Tinderbox stores and Dear Green coffee roasters were selling their products.

Fergus says: “It was a small-scale community enterprise to begin with and while we realized the massive environmental impact Revive Eco could have, I don’t really think any of us expected it to happen so quickly.”

Following the company’s triumph at last year’s Streets Ahead awards, Revive Eco went on to win even more accolades including the St. Enoch Centre Glasgow Business Award for Green Champion at the Glasgow Business Awards. Fergus was also shortlisted in the Shell Livewire Young Entrepreneur of the Year contest.

“There has been so much happening this year, it’s been fantastic,” he says. “We are continuing to develop our business and in particular, a new focus on creating oils for the cosmetic industry which will be a big growth area for us. We have a concrete plan in place for the next 12 months and will be working with partners and other organizations across Europe. It’s really exciting.”

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April 20, 2017
BUP students leave for US to take part in global entrepreneurial competition

BUP teamA three-member student team of Bangladesh University of Professionals (BUP) is going to take part in a global entrepreneurial competition in the USA tomorrow as the champion team of Asia. Texas Christian University is organizing the competition titled "Richards Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition 2017", said a BUP press release here today.

The contestants are Zohair Yousuf Hassan, Abidur Rahman and Ahmed Rubaiyat Souren of BBA General Department under Faculty of Business Studies (FBS). Led by Md Osman Gani, teacher of Marketing Department of the university, the team left here last night (Wednesday) for the USA to join the competition.

Values and Ventures is an entrepreneurial competition that seeks business plans from all over the world, the release added.

Earlier, the BUP team became champion in Asia defeating a number of teams, which participated in the continent level competition.

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April 21, 2017
TCU Values and Ventures competition grows to largest in school historyBy Rachel Tiede

The TCU Richard Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition began Friday with the highest number of competitors the event has ever had.

On the first day of competition, 51 teams pitched business ideas to judges with the hope of moving onto the final rounds Saturday and having a chance at the top prize: $25,000 cash plus $100,000 in in-kind first year support.

“We take care of their marketing, legal, IT, sales–everything they might need in that first year so they can really focus on growing the business,” Matthew Smilor, director of the Values and Ventures Program, said.

Christine Clutterbuck, team member and senior entrepreneurial management and finance double major, said the TCU team’s project focused on virtual reality therapy for children in hospitals to help with anxiety and depression.

“It’s completely different from what you think of as VR because it’s not the entertainment side of things,” Clutterbuck said. “It’s a different avenue you can go down, and that, I think, we see as the next big thing for virtual reality, and the benefits it has medically.”

Teams traveled to TCU from all over the world.

“This year we invited 51 universities from around the world, from as far away as Bangladesh, Croatia, Scotland, and Canada as well as the United States, which marks our largest competition to date,” said Smilor.

He said the judges look for four things to determine the winning team. They analyze pitches to see if it’s a viable business–something the competitors can actually move forward with. Secondly, it must be a value-based business which must improve something in society. The judges also look for presentation and how well the students present their pitch. Finally, they analyze how well the business plan is articulated on paper.

Saturday’s rounds begin at 9:15 a.m. in Brown-Lupton University Union ballroom.

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April 21, 2017
TCU Values and Ventures competition grows to largest in school history

The TCU Richard Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition began Friday with the highest number of competitors the event has ever had.

On the first day of competition, 51 teams pitched business ideas to judges with the hope of moving onto the final rounds Saturday and having a chance at the top prize: $25,000 cash plus $100,000 in in-kind first year support.

“We take care of their marketing, legal, IT, sales–everything they might need in that first year so they can really focus on growing the business,” Matthew Smilor, director of the Values and Ventures Program, said.

Christine Clutterbuck, team member and senior entrepreneurial management and finance double major, said the TCU team’s project focused on virtual reality therapy for children in hospitals to help with anxiety and depression.

“It’s completely different from what you think of as VR because it’s not the entertainment side of things,” Clutterbuck said. “It’s a different avenue you can go down, and that, I think, we see as the next big thing for virtual reality, and the benefits it has medically.”

Teams traveled to TCU from all over the world.

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April 25, 2017
TCU Values and Ventures competition hosts 51 universities

TCU Neeley School of Business has awarded $79,700 to student entrepreneurs in the 2017 Values and Ventures Competition

With 51 universities competing, three local teams received cash awards in the competition.

Locally, Tarleton State won a special innovation award of $2,500. The University of Texas at Arlington won an honorable mention award of $2,500. Southern Methodist University owon a special ripple effect award of $5,000.

The top 18 student teams out of 51 universities won cash and in-kind prizes in the competition that rewards plans for businesses that make a profit while making a difference. More than 100 business professionals served as judges and mentors to provide a solid base of knowledge about the viability of startup businesses.

TCU’s Richards Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition was co-founded by Nancy Tartaglino Richards and Lisa Barrentine of First Preston HT in partnership with the TCU Neeley School of Business. It is presented annually by the Neeley Entrepreneurship Center. Since 2010, 230 teams have vied for nearly $400,000 in cash prizes and $850,000 in kind donations. At least 90 companies have launched from the competition. The unique aspect of the competition is that all plans must be for-profit ventures with a significant values component.

• Grand Prize $25,000 plus $75,000 in kind University of Iowa Health Tech Solutions modernizes communication in organ transplant, using a real-time mobile software application that is HIPAA compliant and facilitates instantaneous communication and information flow.

• Second Place $15,000 plus $15,000 in kind Johns Hopkins University Treyetech has developed a device for corneal surgery that eliminates difficult aspects of the procedure for surgeons by modifying the workflow and reallocating steps to skilled eye bank technicians.

• Third Place $10,000 plus $10,000 in kind Grand Valley State University Stir It Up Bakery provides proprietary training and meaningful employment to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to empower them and decrease turnover for employers.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 University of California-Irvine Closed Loop Plastics transforms plastic waste from 3D printing, campus life and ocean plastics into usable filament for further innovation. The entire process uses only renewable energy.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 University of Michigan Kulisha offers a wastewater treatment solution for food and beverage processing plants that converts organic biosolid waste products into a sustainable insect-based protein for use in animal feeds.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 University of Pikeville CitrOHa has created an all-natural functional dog food additive with an antioxidant and nutritional blend derived from the seeds and peels of lemon-byproducts from citrus juice manufacturing.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 University of Texas at Arlington SolGro provides a nano-phosphor embedded plastic to replace greenhouse canopies with technology that amplifies the sun’s UV light by converting the color spectrum unused by plants into wavelengths needed for photosynthesis.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 University of Virginia PAKA is an alpaca wool apparel company that gives Peruvian women weavers the resources to financially empower themselves. Sustainably is involved in all aspects, from natural dyes, to weaving, to the animal.

• Honorable Mention $2,500 and Founders Award $5,000 University of Chicago Averia Health Solutions provides low-cost concussion sideline screening to young athletes using a device that leverages a smartphone’s camera and computational capabilities to make accurate eye tracking accessible.

• Marjorie and James Sly Innovation Award $2,500 Tarleton State University TreeMendous Tree-Ps wrap around trees for easy-to-use micro-ecosystems that reduce water, energy and herbicide use by 75-90 percent. TreeMendous donates Tree-Ps to school and community gardens.

• Ripple Effect Award $5,000 SMU

Pōk The Raw bar serves primarily healthy, pure, poke raw fish bowls from Hawaii. Through its Imagine X Inspire program, the company partners with CASA Youth Shelter to transition foster teens into adulthood.

• Elevator Pitch First Place $1,000 University of Florida Sci Chic provides 3D printed plastic and metal fashion jewelry to encourage young women to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).

• Elevator Pitch Second Place $500 University of Western Ontario TimeFund lets refugees in displaced communities share skills using time as currency. Refugees can contribute an hour of their time, for example cooking or translating, in exchange for a time coin they can use for other services.

• Elevator Pitch Third Place (tie) $250 Washington University in St. Louis GiftAMeal is a socially conscious marketing platform for restaurants, giving a meal to someone in need each time a user takes a photo at a participating restaurant.

• Elevator Pitch Third Place (tie) $250 University of Alabama BioGram LLC has adapted the panoramic lens used for rocket engine analysis to be part of a new device used to perform minimally invasive heart surgery and endoscopic cancer diagnosis procedures.

• Elevator Pitch Honorable Mention $100 Kennesaw State University Art’NspirED LLC provides handmade products from World Fair Trade craftsmen across the globe, partnering with local schools to advertise while educating students about the nations where the products are created.

• Elevator Pitch Honorable Mention $100 University of Wisconsin-Whitewater RydePass reduces ride-share risk through a mobile platform that serves populations that are vulnerable due to lack of on-hand cash or credit, diminished capacity or located in high-risk areas.

http://neeley.tcu.edu/vandv/

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April 26, 2017
Tarleton student, advisors win Sly Innovation Award at TCU competition

Thomas Rudolph, a Fort Worth business major at Tarleton State University, is one of 18 top winners announced Monday in the TCU Neely Entrepreneurship Center 2017 Values and Ventures Competition.

Thomas and his faculty advisors, Assistant Professor Steven Gerhardt and Dr. Ceyhan Kilic, brought home the $2,500 Marjorie and James Sly Innovation Award in the unique competition that rewards plans for businesses that make a profit while making a difference.

Once up and running, Thomas’ company—TreeMendous Products—will produce innovative tree wraps that create viable micro-ecosystems, reducing water, energy and herbicide use by 75 to 90 percent. Thomas will donate the wraps, called Tree-Ps, to school and community gardens.

Tarleton State University business major Thomas Rudolph (left) and faculty advisor Dr. Ceyhan Kilic were presented with the Marjorie and James Sly Innovation Award following the 2017 Values and Ventures Competition hosted by Texas Christian University’s Neely Entrepreneurship Center. Rudolph attends class at Tarleton-Fort Worth and received a $2,500 prize.

Tree-Ps are perfect for residential as well as large-scale agriculture and reforestation projects, according to Thomas. They are self-sufficient, maintenance free and manageable with minimal effort.

The University of Iowa won the event’s grand prize of $25,000 for Health Tech Solutions, a company created to improve the organ transplant process by using HIPAA-compliant real-time software.

More than 50 university teams submitted plans in this year’s competition, with nearly $230,000 in cash and inkind services awarded.

Since the competition started seven years ago, 230 teams have vied for nearly $400,000 in cash prizes and $850,000 in kind. At least 90 companies have launched.

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April 26, 2017
UI student-owned business wins $100,000 at prestigious TCU start-up competition

HealthTech Solutions, a business founded by two University of Iowa students, both from Iowa, that makes it easier to connect organ donors with recipients, won the grand prize in a start-up venture competition sponsored by TCU.

The team won $25,000 in cash and $75,000 in in-kind services, including marketing/advertising, IT consulting, legal consulting, and financial services consulting.

Health Tech Solutions was founded by Dalton Shaull, a 2016 UI engineering graduate from Oskaloosa, Iowa, and Eric Pahl, a Health Informatics doctoral student from Ames, Iowa. The company modernizes communication in organ transplant, using a real-time mobile software application that facilitates instantaneous communication and information flow. The innovation allows clients to coordinate organ transplants in a real-time, collaborative communication process so that no donated organ goes to waste and the more than 120,000 people in the US waiting for a donated organ will receive one.

The business is headquartered in the Bedell Entrepreneurship Learning Laboratory (BELL), the University of Iowa’s start-up incubator for student-owned businesses managed by the John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center (JPEC).

The Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition brought together students from 51 universities with start-up businesses that benefit specific populations, communities, and/or the environment to compete at TCU’s Neeley School of Business.

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April 28, 2017
UCI students earn $2,500 award in Values and Ventures Competition

UC Irvine students from the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Claire Trevor School of the Arts earned a fourth-place honorable mention and $2,500 at the TCU Richards Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition.

The event at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas, featured students from around the world pitching plans for businesses, products or services that benefit the environment, community or particular population, according to a news release.

UCI’s entry, called Closed Loop Plastics, used renewable energy to transform plastic waste into material for 3D printing.

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May 1, 2017
UPIKE students excel during national entrepreneurship challenge

Pikeville teamPIKEVILLE – University of Pikeville students earned fourth place and $2,500 during the seventh annual Richards Barrentine Values and Ventures Competition. More than 100 teams from 65 colleges and universities from across the country applied for the entrepreneurship competition hosted by Texas Christian University (TCU). TCU accepted 51 teams as semifinalists to present in Fort Worth, Texas.

Christin Justice of Pikeville, and Nicholas Rodenbusch of Simmern, Germany, make up UPIKE’s team CitrOHa. Their business plan includes an all-natural functional food additive with an antioxidant and nutritional blend derived from the seeds and peels of citrus-byproducts to address osteoarthritis in dogs. This is the third most common reason why dogs visit a veterinarian and is a $3 billion cost in the U.S.

“This is the largest and most prestigious undergraduate competition in existence,” said David Snow, director of the Kentucky Innovation Network Pikeville office, SBI program and business competitions and associate professor of business at the University of Pikeville-Coleman College of Business. “The student business plans for this competition were extremely impressive. For example, the first place team from the University of Iowa created a platform to address the problem that 54 percent of donated organs are not transplanted because of communication inefficiencies in the organ transplant process. Their product has already been used for 40 transplant cases.”

Each team was given 12 minutes to present its business plan to a panel of judges. Afterwards, the judges were allowed 10 minutes to ask questions. The UPIKE team won its bracket, which includes seven schools, and advanced to the finals. To do this, the team outscored students from James Madison University, Ohio University, Tarleton State University, the University of Florida, the University of Western Ontario and Wake Forest University.

The finalist presentations took place before an accomplished group of judges including Jeff Hoffman, the founder of Priceline.com, a company currently worth $80 billion.

Some of the best business schools and entrepreneurship programs in the U.S. were represented. High ranking business school participants included University of Chicago (3rd), University of Michigan (11th), University of Virginia (14th), University of Texas (17th), University of North Carolina (18th), Emory University (20th), Georgetown University (tied 21st), Washington University (tied 21st), and many others. High ranking undergraduate entrepreneurship program participants included University of Michigan (3rd), University of Houston (6th), Washington University (10th), University of Oklahoma (12th), University of North Carolina (14th), University of Iowa (19th), Texas Christian University (21st), Loyola Marymount University (24th), and many others.